DMP Definitions – Emollient

Suffering with dry skin? Has the sun and wind made your skin look like Queen Elsa’s been around you? Or perhaps more seriously, do you suffer with Dermatitis or any other skin condition? Keep reading.

Essentially emollients work as a deep moisturising agents for the skin working to soften the skin cells at a molecular level. You can get them in moisturisers, creams, lotions and ointments and can be applied topically to any part of your skin. This can be particularly helpful for people who suffer with Dermatitis, Psoriasis, Eczema, Allergic Contact Dermatitis and dry skin in general.

You can get almost instant relief as the emollients work to lock in hydration and trap moisture into any part of your skin. This slows down the rate at which you lose moisture and keeps skin plump and hydrated.

My favourite emollient is Vaseline or petroleum jelly and I have family members who moisturise with Vaseline and that alone although I do not recommend this. It would be more beneficial to add moisturiser then an emollient to the skin or better yet, find an emollient moisturising cream and slather that all over your self.

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A great moisturiser recommendation (and a popular one at that) is CeraVe an all over body moisturiser and it can even be applied safely to the face. This is widely available but if you can’t find it in shops, do check out iHerb.com as they stock it and ship at reasonable prices. Another is any of Neutrogena’s Oil-Free Moisture moisturisers.

I hope you’ve found this post somewhat informative and above all else, I hope you find some relief in dry and itchy skin problems.

Remember to love your health!

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Disclaimer: I am not a Doctor, Dermatologist, Beauty Therapist, or Aesthetician, I just love skincare and health and love sharing what I learn with you. Always speak to your healthcare professional when unsure. None of the information provided is substitute for an actual consultation with your healthcare professional.

 

DMP Definitions – Comedogenic

You’ve probably heard or read ‘Non-Comedogenic’Β on skincare packaging before. Today I talk about Comedogenic, it’s meaning, why you should avoid ingredients that are and a shout out to my favourite brand!

Definition:

‘Comedo’ meaning blockage and Comedogenic meaning that the ingredient has the potential to block your pores which causes blackheads, whiteheads or a full blown breakout of bacterial acne. If you have a very oily, sensitive or acne prone skin type, at all costs avoid these ingredients. They can be found in cleansers, moisturizers, makeup/cosmetics, masks, sunscreen, shaving foam, body washes and even certain types of oils and are know irritants. Sometimes it’s as simple as getting familiar with certain ingredients. Although if you’re not a trained professional this can be a little difficult of course but achievable the more you read and learn πŸ™‚

Catch these guys out next time you’re reading the back of your skin product/cosmetics you plan to slather all over your face.

Types of Comedogenic Ingredients Include:

  • Essential oils, coconut oil, any oils from from plants
  • Dyes and colors
  • Fragrance
  • Menthol
  • Parabens

When you use a product with Comedogenic ingredients you immediately run the risk of blocking your pores as it does the opposite of what you wish to achieve. It could very well be a certain product you’re using in your current daily routine that you’re completely unaware of. So time to get savvy on those words!

Why You Should Avoid Comedogenic Ingredients:

We look for cleansers, sunscreens and moisturizers to help our skin out in one way or another. Whether it be to unclog, clean, exfoliate, protect or give coverage if we use these skin care products on a daily basis you can imagine the risk you run creating a breeding ground of bacteria and mountainous red, black and white bumps *ick* and an endless cycle that never seems to clear.

My Favourite Brand for Comedogenic Free Products:

Neutrogena is far becoming my ultimate favourite brand of skin care line to which I personally own moisturizers, sunscreen, cleansers and face masks and more as I know that some, (can’t assume all) have friendly reminders somewhere on the packaging that they’re non-comedogenic meaning you’re safe from any harsh ingredients you could possibly break out to. Now that’s piece of mind for someone like me who can get a little confused with ingredients listed on the back.

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Do you know any brands that you see list their products as, “Non-Comedogenic“? I’d love to know your recommendations as well so let me know below.

Remember to love your health πŸ™‚

Dee X

DMP Definitions – Beta Hydroxy Acids

“Welcome back, welcome, welcome back!” To another post on DMP Definitions where I explain common skincare terminology in layman terms.

Last week the series looked at Alpha Hydroxy Acids and now onto the next letter of the Greek alphabet. The series continues today with you guessed it, BHA’s or Beta Hydroxy Acids.

What are their purpose, how to use them and benefits for you next!

Purpose

BHA’s work much the same as Alpha’s however target the upper most layer of skin and the pores which can help if you suffer from constant breakouts and acne. They are typically a little more stronger than AHA’s aim to penetrate deep down into the pores to stop inflammation and unplug pores.

Common BHA’s Include:

Salicylic and Glycolic acid an ingredient more commonly found in acne treatments and topical lotions, creams and pads.

How to use in your routine:

Step 1. Cleanse (with cleanser or water)

Step 2. Exfoliate with physical (optional, with Deluxe Fiber Facial Cloth)

Step 3. Exfoliate with chemical BHA (alternate days in between chemical use, not advised to be used everyday)

Step 4. Apply serum/s (wrinkles, age spots or PIH)

Step 5. Spot treat if necessary

Step 6. Moisturise

Step 7. Add emollient to lock in hydration

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Two of my favourite BHA’s recommendations.

Benefits

If you have particularly oily skin then a BHA may be a good option to use as a chemical exfoliant. They aim to penetrate the pore at the follicle and release the toxic gunk build up that’s caused the eruption on your face, turn over skin cells and regulate oil production. If you have oily skin, please remember to still moisturize as you skin will need the boost of hydration as chemicals will lead to dryness eventually.

We hope you enjoyed this post on BHA’s and stay tuned for more by following our blog.

Remember to love your health!

Dee X